NEBRASKA: Its Land, Its People
May
19
Feb 25

NEBRASKA: Its Land, Its People

  • Museum of Nebraska Art
Barbara Takenaga, Nebraska II, 2015, Acrylic on linen

Barbara Takenaga, Nebraska II, 2015, Acrylic on linen

The year 2017 marks Nebraska’s 150th anniversary of statehood. The Museum of Nebraska Art (MONA) is uniquely positioned to observe this milestone, since MONA’s mission is to showcase the art and cultural history of the state. The Museum is proud to feature, through a series of exhibitions, its permanent collection in a visual festival of Nebraska art in honor of Nebraska’s Sesquicentennial.

Artworks that speak about the richness and diversity of the state’s land and its people, this selection presents some of the most iconic images that represent the history of Nebraska from the 19th century to the present day. Drawn from the Museum’s collection together with loans from other institutions and private lenders, artists include Albert Bierstadt, William Henry Jackson, Robert Henri, Elizabeth Dolan, Aaron Douglas, Aaron Pyle, William Ellsworth Artis, Donald Ruleaux, Carol Haerer, Sheila Hicks, Robert Weaver, Robert Adams, Barbara Takenaga, and Kent Bellows, among numerous others.

Nebraska Arts Council 2016 Visual Artist Fellowships
May
19
Aug 20

Nebraska Arts Council 2016 Visual Artist Fellowships

  • Museum of Nebraska Art
David Gracie, Bantam Company, 2016, Oil on board

David Gracie, Bantam Company, 2016, Oil on board

In 2016, the Nebraska Arts Council (NAC) awarded its Individual Artist Fellowships to 10 Nebraska visual artists. The artists recognized with the Distinguished Achievement Award were Sarah Berkeley, Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez, Josh Johnson, Bradley Peters, and Angie Seykora. Those who received the Merit Awards were James Bockelman, Charley Friedman, David Gracie, Neil Griess, and Matthew Sontheimer. These artists, who work in a variety of media including photography, painting, performance, drawing, installation, collage, video, and sculpture, are featured in this exhibition of the 2016 Fellowship Artists.

Nebraska Now: Mallory Wetherell, Ceramics
Jul
8
Oct 6

Nebraska Now: Mallory Wetherell, Ceramics

  • Mueseum of Nebraska Art
Mallory Wetherell, Hold & Piece, Control, Contemplation, Under, 2017, porcelain

Mallory Wetherell, Hold & Piece, Control, Contemplation, Under, 2017, porcelain

Artist Talk and Reception: July 22, 1:30 PM


South Carolina native and University of Nebraska at Kearney Assistant Professor of Art Mallory Wetherell unflinchingly uses her body as subject in her most recent drawings and ceramics. Wetherell’s work compels viewers to consider the female form: wives, mothers, sisters, friends, companions, or self in light of contemporary societal expectations.


Nebraska Now: Matthew Sontheimer
Apr
8
Jul 2

Nebraska Now: Matthew Sontheimer

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

April 8 – July 2, 2017

Matthew Sontheimer’s densely executed and intensely articulated collages depict an on-going verbal dialogue between two fictional characters. The works, small in scale, “are created for close viewing: to be read slowly, to get lost in, to locate and discover references, and then to step back and regard again as a complete form.” Sontheimer, a New Orleans native, is an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Artist Talk and Reception: April 8 • 1:30 p.m.

Nebraska Now exhibitions are sponsored by Deanna and Fred Bosselman.

Nebraska Now: Charley Friedman, The New Deal
Jan
14
Apr 2

Nebraska Now: Charley Friedman, The New Deal

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

A bevy of wax squirrels, felt hands, and a lighted doorway fill the Yanney Skylight Gallery in Charley Friedman’s first solo exhibition at MONA. Nebraska native Friedman, an artist not limited or defined by choice of media, reconfigures everyday objects and occurrences to question life and contemporary culture.

Fade Like A Sigh
Jan
9
Feb 17

Fade Like A Sigh

  • Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts

Fade Like a Sigh
Photographs by Zora J. Murff and Rana Young

Exhibition runs Monday, January 9- February 17, 2017
Gallery Reception: Thursday, November 17th, 5 to 7 p.m. 

The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts presents a new exhibition, “Fade Like a Sigh: Photographs by Zora J Murff and Rana Young” beginning Monday, January 9 and continuing through February 17th, 2017. The gallery reception will be held February 16th, 5-7 p.m., and coincides with our Third Thursday Open Studio event.

Photographers Zora J. Murff and Rana Young examine gaps that occur in visual communication, between what we know, and what we think we know. Through dialogues about a shared experience -- exploring the void left by an absent parent -- the question posed between these artists is: what do you remember?

My mom would sometimes tell me, “You have your father’s charm.” When she said this, she wasn’t paying me compliment, the words felt fatalistic. I remember the sound of his voice: gravelly and deep. I could listen to him talk for hours on end, there was a comfort there…perhaps he had worked his charm on me.

I’ve been told since I was a little girl that I have her eyes, her skin, her dark hair. I see myself when I look at pictures of her. I used to buy myself roses and lilies, the flowers she had chosen for their wedding. My dad said that she didn’t have it in her to be a mother; she was lonely, the type of lonely that company can’t fix. 

Zora J Murff has a B.S. in Psychology from Iowa State University, studied photography at the University of Iowa, and is an MFA candidate at the University of Nebraska. His work has been exhibited nationally, internationally, and in print, including Vice Magazine, GOOD Magazine,The British Journal of Photography and Wired Magazine's Raw File. Zora was named a “Joy of Giving Something Fellow” through Imagining America in 2016, a LensCulture 2015 Top 50 Emerging Talent, and was a 2014 Photolucida Critical Mass finalist. A portfolio of his work is included in the Midwest Photographers Project through the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. Zora published his first monograph, Corrections, through Aint-Bad Editions in the Winter of 2015. 

Rana Young earned her BFA at Portland State University, and is an MFA candidate at the University of Nebraska. Rana was included in Midwest Center for Photography’s exhibition “Developed Work – 2016 National Photography Fellowship Competition”, included in Detroit Center for Photography’s “NEW DIRECTIONS Gallery”, awarded Second Place in the “2016 Lenscratch Student Prize”, and was a recipient of Society for Photographic Education’s “2016 Innovations in Imaging Award.” Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, as well as published online by Fraction Magazine, Fotografia Magazine, and Aint-Bad Magazine among others. 

The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts is located at 801 Third Corso in Nebraska City and is regularly open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m and for special events. Both the exhibit and the reception are free, handicapped accessible, and open to the public of all ages. KHN is a program of the Richard P. Kimmel and Laurine Kimmel Charitable Foundation, Inc

Linqua Franca
Nov
6
Dec 14

Linqua Franca

  • Concordia University

Jennifer Bockelman, Charley Friedman, Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez, Camille Hawbaker, Anthony Hawley, Josh Johnson, Ellina Kevorkian, Holly Kranker, Michael Ian Larsen, Craig Roper, Sarah Rowe, Angie Seykora, Luke Severson, Matthew Sontheimer, and Sheila Talbitzer

 

 

“Movies are the lingua franca of the twentieth century”  - Gore Vidal

 

Lingua Franca is a language that is used among people who speak various different languages, used as a means of communication between populations speaking vernaculars that are not mutually intelligible. The term was first used during the Middle Ages to describe a French- and Italian-based jargon, or pidgin, that was developed by Crusaders and traders in the eastern Mediterranean and characterized by the invariant forms of its nouns, verbs, and adjectives, often serving as a trade language.   Since the 15th century, Arabic, Latin, Portuguese and Malay served as important diplomatic and trade languages. 

 

Today, lingua francas especially, but also pidgins, represent an attempt to create universally understood languages in a world with growing global interactions.  The shared language helped facilitate interethnic or interregional communication.     Lingua francas, pidgins, or creoles are significant to geography, represents a long history of communication between various groups of people and is an important gauge of what was taking place at the time the language developed. Modern lingua francas, as designated by the United Nations are Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish.  Others are: Indonesian, Esperanto, Lingala, Swahili, Hausa, Creole.

 

Visual art communicates in a similar way.  In creating art, consciously or not, artists are attempting to communicate at a powerful, emotional level to those within their own culture. However, the best work transcends its cultural matrix and speaks directly to our common humanity.  The current socio-political climate is reflected in the choice of media, materials, and technique as well as the content and the aesthetic and conceptual sophistication of the work.  Ideas and thoughts are an important gauge of what is taking place at the time the work was developed.

 

The artists represented create work that is in conversation with the current global contemporary art climate, while in consideration with art history.  Their work possesses a certain universal worldview that speaks a common language, a visual art lingua franca.

Mujeres
Oct
18
Feb 12

Mujeres

Mujeres, translated to “women” in English, is the first exhibition in Nebraska to focus on the shared existence of five contemporary artists: all women, all Latino, and all connected to the state. The artists selected are Claudia Alvarez, Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez, Linda Garcia-Perez, Reneé A. Ledesma, and Sandra Williams. While each artist hails from different backgrounds, different countries – Colombia, Mexico, the United States, and from different cultures within the Latino experience, their artwork finds common themes that swirl around history, family, religion and spirituality, as well as finding a sense of place in the American landscape.

Mujeres is sponsored by Younes Hospitality, Paul and Linda Younes
Humanities Nebraska and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment

Born in the Corn Exhibition
Sep
29
Jan 8

Born in the Corn Exhibition

  • Bone Creek Museum of Agrarian Art

Chicago artist Cathi Schwable and 2016’s Cornhusker Hotel Artist in Residence Margaret Berry will collaborate with one another and Bone Creek to create an art exhibition/project that may even extend beyond the confines of the museum walls. Both artists have a history of working with corn and additionally both artists are currently working with bees and beeswax. Margaret is mostly an encaustic artist and Cathi is a multi-media artist who works with clay, found objects, textiles, and skirts the line between art and social practice.

The exhibition hopes to involve the community in more ways than typical visual art exhibitions. Likely this show will be a combination of previous works by the two artists and a set of new work (made individually and/or collaboratively). Also in the works are a Corn Hunt, a citywide scavenger hunt for clay corn cobs; a Corn Fest, fundraising dinner event; and a Corn and Wax one-day artist workshop with Margaret Berry in November, 2016.

Nebraska Now: Waite White, Prints
Jul
9
5:00 pm17:00

Nebraska Now: Waite White, Prints

Painter, printmaker, and public artist Watie White focuses within his artwork on narratives of the “absurd and obvious” or those that are “socially engaged.” White, an Omaha based artist, brings to MONA his large-scale public art linocut portraits as well as studio-based single-block woodcuts of detailed landscapes.

Artist Talk and Reception: July 9 • 1:30 p.m.
2016 Nebraska Now exhibitions are sponsored by Fred & Deanna Bosselman.

Jul
5
Aug 5

Toward Firmness

  • Kimmel Harding Nelson Center
TowardFirmness_Poster.jpg

Qwist Joseph’s sculptural work delves into thought process through object creation, collection and composition, in an effort to record its evolution and fluidity. Toward Firmness showcases these ephemeral moments frozen in permanent materials, creating both tension and connection between the past, present and future. Disorienting displays resist obvious definitions, anticipating the discovery of meaning to come through the experience of looking. American culture is one of immediacy and knowability; this work is meant to offer a departure from that monotonous reality.

After many years working alongside his Dad at the family bronze foundry, Qwist Joseph received his BFA from Colorado State University and later his MFA in ceramics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Currently, he is a Windgate Fellow summer resident at the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts in Helena, Montana.

RECEPTION
Thursday, July 21: 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

VISIT KIMMEL HARDING NELSON CENTER
Monday-Friday: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Resemblance Erosion
May
16
Jun 24

Resemblance Erosion

  • Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts

The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts presents a new exhibition, Resemblance Erosion: Sculpture by Josh Johnson, beginning Monday, May 16 and continuing through June 24, 2016. The gallery reception will be held May 19th, 5-7 p.m., and coincides with our Third Thursday Open Studio event.

Sculptor Josh Johnson makes connections between two environments -- one at hand, and the other remembered. Resemblance Erosion offers a sideways glance of Plains landscape, softening the edges between the physicality of what is materially accessible and the limited view offered by the mind’s eye. Drawing upon the rock formations of the South Dakota Badlands and their fabricated proxies dotting Lincoln’s Antelope Creek greenway, Johnson carves, fabricates, and joins second-hand materials into lonely vistas alluding to the slippages associated with memory’s shaky hold on place.

Josh Johnson earned a BFA at the University of North Dakota, and an MFA at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has exhibited nationally, including shows at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, Colorado State University, and Manifest Gallery in Cincinnati. Josh received a 2016 Nebraska Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship, and was twice selected as a finalist for the William and Dorothy Yeck Young Sculptor’s Competition at Miami University in Oxford, OH. Josh currently teaches sculpture at Nebraska Wesleyan University.

The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts is located at 801 Third Corso in Nebraska City and is regularly open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m and for special events. Both the exhibit and the reception are free, handicapped accessible, and open to the public of all ages. KHN is a program of the Richard P. Kimmel and Laurine Kimmel Charitable Foundation, Inc. 

Apr
19
Aug 8

Deeply Rooted: Studio Art Quilt Associates

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

 

April 19 – August 7, 2016

Deeply Rooted, a juried exhibition organized by the Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA), explores the meaning of “roots” through the quilt medium. Thirty works are featured, all created by SAQA members from Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, and Wisconsin. SAQA, founded in 1989, is an organization of more than 3,000 fiber artists devoted to the education, exhibition, promotion, professional development, and documentation of the medium.

Reception:
Saturday, June 11 • 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Remarks at 6:30 p.m.

Nebraska Now: Mark Hartman, Paintings
Apr
9
Jul 3

Nebraska Now: Mark Hartman, Paintings

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

April 9 – July 3, 2016
Mark Hartman, Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, is a painter, draftsman, mixed media artist, and graphic designer. In his first solo exhibition at MONA, Hartman brings his love of media and the act of creation to works that are both spontaneous in nature as well as methodically executed.

Artist Talk and Reception: April 9 • 1:30 p.m.
2016 Nebraska Now exhibitions are sponsored by Deanna & Fred Bosselman

 

Mark Hartman
“The Sacred Heart”
acrylic on canvas, 2007-2008
Gift of the Artist

Mar
14
Mar 30

Alison Harris

  • Gallery 239, Chadron State College

Artist's Information
Harris believes that the act of drawing is an act of discovery. She works primarily with the figure and almost exclusively from direct observation in order to deconstruct and reconstruct on the page what she has discovered through her observations. Always intrigued by how each person is unique, she uses the body as her guidebook to a particular human being and tries to make the strongest possible representation of that specific presence. She uses a person’s physical clues to help reveal each person physically, psychologically, emotionally, and spiritually in order to study what it is that makes us unique and a member of the human race.

Mar
3
Mar 30

Sheldon Exhibit

  • Chadron State College Art Gallery

Statement about the Sheldon Exhibit:
The 2015-2016 Sheldon Statewide exhibition will feature artwork from the permanent collection of the Sheldon Art Association and the University of Nebraska—Lincoln, that explores several common themes found in science fiction. Through paintings, photographs, and prints, artists in the exhibitions depict examples of space exploration, environmental crisis, the cosmic uncanny, the relationship between human and machine, close encounters, and creative invention.
The Romance of the Moon is the 29th Sheldon Statewide exhibition, and will display artwork from sixteen artists, including Dick Calkins, Vija Celmins, Salvador Dalí, Ian Davis, Harold Eugene Edgerton, Dana Fritz, Moebius (Jean Giraud), Nancy Graves, Phil Hale, Wassily Kandinsky, Gladys Marie Lux, Lowell Nesbitt, John Pfahl, Theodore Roszak, Kenny Scharf, and Rick Yager.

Feb
16
Mar 4

Belgin Yucelen

  • Gallery 239, Chadron State College

Belgin Yucelen Artist's Statement:
Sculpting is a way to communicate for me, a way to record my emotions. It provides an imagery where I can present my ideas and beliefs. I would like to see my work as a philosophical journey through the essential elements of life. Sculpting is an act of giving for me.
The human figure is the main source of my work. For me, sculpting is the aesthetic appreciation of beauty. But beauty can be formed out of ugliness as long as it is presented poetically.
To me art is beautiful if it is simple and quiet. I sculpt ideas without details that obscure the art’s imaginary attributes. When it is time for the realization of an idea, I start sculpting. There is always a call, but the result is unknown even though I know why I am making it.
Creating is exhausting, but it is rewarding. I work with clay which is responsive but hand has its own dreams. I stop when I see my idea born together with some magic.
Printing helps me convey my ideas in an immediate fashion. Yet, the results can be mysterious and surprising.
“Art is a lie that makes us realize the truth.”

Jan
11
Feb 19

Doug Waterfield

  • Chadron State College Art Gallery

Doug Waterfield Artist Statement:

Artist's Statement:
Two years since I have updated my artist's statement, so I thought it was time. As of late, I have been consumed with the idea of atomic art. For me, atomic art involves art that deals not only with front and center images of the Bomb, but also atomic testing, particularly imahes of the Doomtown that was set up in the Nevada desert, and then lit up by atomic blasts to see what the effects on the typical American town would be. I am also concerned with the effect of the Bomb on American culture - the paranoia, the acknowledgement, acceptance and eventual embracing of the Bomb and its insertion into American popular culture.
There is no shortage of fodder to draw from, from educational films, to 1950s comic books, horror and science fiction movies, civil defense literature, fallout shelter plans, radiation detectors - this list goes on. This is a part of our culture that is really foreign to a lot of today's young people. I want to make art that educates about this era. Knowledge is a good thing - it's how we keep history from repeating itself, theoretically anyway.

Dec
29
May 3

Nebraska Now: Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez, travelers and Settlers

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

January 9 – April 3, 2016
Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez’s installation, Travelers and Settlers, is an exploration of the “experience of identity, memory, and gender.” By including family heirlooms alongside carved wood boats and black mirror-like panels that hold pearled sconces, the artist creates an environment that is beautiful, engaging, and introspective. Born in Colombia, Friedemann-Sánchez has lived and worked in both Bogota and New York and now resides in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Artist Talk and Reception: January 9 • 1:30 p.m.
2016 Nebraska Now exhibitions are sponsored by Deanna & Fred Bosselman

Dec
15
Feb 28

MONA’s Recent Acquisitions

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

Over the last two and a half years, MONA has added almost 200 new artworks to its permanent collection. This large and diverse group includes paintings, sculpture, photography, prints, as well as other various media, ranging from representational to non-representational, created over the span of 150 years. This exhibition also includes a small group of artworks that are at the top of MONA’s acquisition “wish list” and were selected to further expand the Museum’s mission to tell the visual history of the state and region.

VISIT MONA
Tuesday to Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sundays: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Closed Monday and major holidays

 

Nov
9
Dec 18

Places I Sleep / An exhibition of photographs by Sarah Berkeley

  • Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts

On view November 9 - December 18, 2015

The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts is proud to present a series of new photographs by Sarah Berkeley entitled, "Places I Sleep." The in-progress series is themed around the interior spaces that the artist has inhabited for at least one night. Berkeley, an assistant professor at Nebraska Wesleyan University, has exhibited frequently in Nebraska, as well as nationally and internationally. Her work frequently questions cultural norms such as the 9:00 to 5:00 work day, the office environment, indoor living, gender stereotypes, and the voluntary sharing of personal data. Regarding her new photographic series on display at KHN, Berkeley states, "outward looking views alternate with contemplative images of ceilings, speaking to domestic space as both confining and a portal for spirituality." 

Sarah Berkeley is an artist who works across media creating public interventions and durational performances which she documents using photography, video and GPS. She holds an MFA from University of Michigan (2011) and a BFA from University of Nebraska-Lincoln (2002). She has completed residencies at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, The Ragdale Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, ACRE, the Cedar Point Biological Station and 8550 OHIO. Her artwork has been collected and exhibited internationally including the Joslyn Museum of Art, Defibrillator Gallery, Rapid Pulse, Rutgers University, and Mana Contemporary.

Nov
4
Nov 25

Chris Holton, Jade Lowder, and Matthew Schwager "Fifty Thousand Years of Nonlinear Editing"

  • Nordstrand Visual Arts Gallery

This exhibit features work from WSC faculty member Chris Holton and two artists from Montana. An artists' talk and opening reception will begin at 3:45 p.m. Nov. 4.

WSC faculty member Chris Holton, along with Jade Lowder and Matthew Schwager of Montana, will be featured in the "Fifty Thousand Years of Nonlinear Editing" exhibit. Read more about the featured artists.

Artists' Talk: 3:45 to 4:15 p.m. in Gardner Auditorium

Opening Reception: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Nordstrand Visual Arts Gallery (second floor of the Peterson Fine Arts Building)

The Nordstrand Art Gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All shows end at noon on the closing day.

For more information on this exhibition and upcoming shows, or to learn more about the Nordstrand Visual Arts Gallery, visit www.wsc.edu/artgallery or call 402-375-7359.

Oct
19
Nov 13

Todd Christensen

  • Chadron State College Art Gallery

Todd Christensen artist statement:

Overall, my work is autobiographical in nature and explores my perspective on life and world events: personal, social, political, visual, moral, etc. Much of the work involves social observation and more specifically observations of people within social contexts. I explore the tension, communication, or lack of communication taking place. Social anxieties play a large role in the underlying themes. I try to capture the sense of being overwhelmed by external forces, images, and ideas.
I find it important to break up these ideas with images of small, ordinary, or even random objects: a drawing of a pronghorn antelope, a paper bag, an abandoned shoe, a telephone.
Other ideas and sub-themes within the work include: written journal like entries, remembered stories from childhood, nostalgia for a past that doesn’t exist, obsessive compulsive tendencies, collecting and hoarding as a means of psychological longing, hermetic and coded connections, charts and diagrams, family, education, political events, and humor. At the moment I could go for a nice, juicy pork-chop.

Oct
13
Feb 21

This Big Land

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

Artists both native to Nebraska and those traveling through have been struck by the vast land and sky of the prairies. This exhibition focuses on works that utilize large-scale formats to capture that seemingly limitless sensation as well as the intricacies that lie therein.

VISIT MONA
Tuesday to Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sundays: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Closed Monday and major holidays

 

Oct
10
Jan 3

Nebraska Now: Jake Jacobson, Ceramics

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

With a career spanning almost 30 years, artist and Emeritus Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska at Kearney shows his animated and pristine ceramic vessels based on common objects like teapots and ewers. His work is inspired by the tinkering and inventive nature of the Midwest farmers and workers – those who improvise with machinery by connecting bits and parts to serve their function.

VISIT MONA
Tuesday to Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sundays: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Closed Monday and major holidays

 

Sep
22
Nov 29

This Big Land: Catherine Meier

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

Nebraska native Catherine Meier has researched and created artwork that explores the intense expansiveness of the Plains in both the Midwest and Mongolia. In this exhibition, she exhibits her work, The Distance of Horizon, an animated graphite drawing that extends over 20 feet wide and eight feet in height, and a companion to This Big Landexhibition also on view.

VISIT MONA
Tuesday to Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sundays: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Closed Mondays and major holidays

 

Jul
21
Apr 17

Still, Motion, Time

  • Museum of Nebraska Art

How long does it take to know a work of art? Contemplation and making personal connections require time. In actual time, we sometimes need to move around or through an artwork or watch it over a period of time to experience it. Then there is work that references the passing of time, a time in history, or the evolution of art movements. Some pieces of art are so impactful, they can seem to suspend time or take us back in time. Thus time always has a powerful and imperative presence in our dynamic interaction with works of art.

VISIT MONA
Tuesday to Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sundays: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Closed Monday and major holidays